I am dating a younger woman

03-Oct-2017 23:05

A mere twenty years had passed since the invention of the ARPANET, but few people remembered it now.

For it had become a happy victim of its own overwhelming success.

ARPANET’s users had warped the computer-sharing network into a dedicated, high-speed, federally subsidized electronic postal service.

The main traffic was not long-distance computing, but news and personal messages.

Interestingly, one of the first really big mailing lists was “SF-LOVERS”, for science fiction fans.

Discussing science fiction on the network was not work-related and was frowned upon by many ARPANET computer administrators, but this didn’t stop it from happening.

How could the US authorities successfully communicate after a nuclear war?The route that the packet took would be unimportant. Basically, the packet would be tossed like a hot potato from node to node, until it ended up in the proper place.If big pieces of the network had been blown away, that simply wouldn’t matter.The ARPA’s original software for communication was known as NCP, “Network Control Protocol”, but as time passed and the technique advanced, NCP was superseded by a higher-level, more sophisticated standard known as TCP/IP.This software converted messages into streams of packets at the source, then reassembled them back into messages at the destination.

How could the US authorities successfully communicate after a nuclear war?

The route that the packet took would be unimportant. Basically, the packet would be tossed like a hot potato from node to node, until it ended up in the proper place.

If big pieces of the network had been blown away, that simply wouldn’t matter.

The ARPA’s original software for communication was known as NCP, “Network Control Protocol”, but as time passed and the technique advanced, NCP was superseded by a higher-level, more sophisticated standard known as TCP/IP.

This software converted messages into streams of packets at the source, then reassembled them back into messages at the destination.

As early as 1977, TCP/IP was being used by other networks to link to ARPANET.