Dating one one ru

12-Jan-2018 01:00

Arguably, it always has, but even more so today, in the age of the online persona and Tinder.

Humans are complex and social media only complicates the issue.

This leads us to idealize one another, putting our “social media crushes” on pedestals without really knowing who they are. For one, your mere presence on the app comes with certain expectations and assumptions.

You’ll get super forward messages right off the bat (albeit, mostly from men) because it’s assumed that if you’re on Tinder, you’re there to have sex.

If you lose one person, it’s not a big deal because you have a hundred others at your disposal.

Weigel explains, “the whole way these apps are structured makes it so it sort of seems foolish to sink too much time into any one person you get in front of you if it doesn’t seem exactly right.”Author of Gretchen Rubin, explains that people can be categorized as “satisficers” and “maximizers” (or a mix of both).

We curate ourselves, carefully selecting words and photos that express ourselves as we want to be seen.

Get noticed for who you are, not what you look like.

The elements of choice and control also come into play on Tinder.

When you’re talking to many different people on Tinder, there is no incentive to dedicate too much time to any one individual.

Swiping through a seemingly unlimited pool of potential partners, the cycle becomes inevitable. However, if there’s always someone else, there’s never really anyone.

Swipe, match, have a conversation or two until FOMO kicks in. In psychologist Barry Schwartz’s book, , he explains that satisficers tend to be happier than maximizers.

Get noticed for who you are, not what you look like.

The elements of choice and control also come into play on Tinder.

When you’re talking to many different people on Tinder, there is no incentive to dedicate too much time to any one individual.

Swiping through a seemingly unlimited pool of potential partners, the cycle becomes inevitable. However, if there’s always someone else, there’s never really anyone.

Swipe, match, have a conversation or two until FOMO kicks in. In psychologist Barry Schwartz’s book, , he explains that satisficers tend to be happier than maximizers.

In fact, maybe even more so than before because you can’t assume that someone wants to have sex with you in the moment because they said so online.