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Dinners in many urban taverns were, following English custom, offered as "ordinarys"...meaning a prepared meal open to the public offered at an established time for a set rate...Dishes, in some cases, were passed communally and not available as individual portions...Earliest prices are expressed in pence/colonial scrip. Food was generally included with the price of room.Food units are generally for large quantities, not comparable to modern supermarket prices. [SOURCE: Prices in Colonial Pennyslvania, Anne Bezanson, et al, University of Pennsylvania Press, 1935.] [1786-1817] Median annual prices for 14 leading commodities, Western Prices Before 1861/Thomas Senior Berry [Harvard University Press: Boston] 1943 [NOTE: This book offers dozens of price charts, including seasonal variations of Cincinnati Wholesale Commodity Prices 1824-1860 (p. [1832] Meat prices, Boston MA [1849] Retail food costs, California gold miners [1861-1865] American Civil War food prices [1860-2009] The Value of A Dollar: Prices and Incomes in the United States, selected food prices extracted from advertisements and federal data [NOTE: Value of a Dollar books are available in most public libraries. Urban taverns offered a wider range of services, including both public and private dining facilties. Pricing notes here: "The fare in a rural tavern..simple, whatever the tavern keeper had on hand for his/her own family and was willing to share...Among those more frequently met with are labor, shoes, butter, provisions, wine--doubtless 'home brew'--bottles, hay and other commodities of nature.However, to find a plow credited to the account of John Meeker [1792]..somewhat of a surprise." ---"An Elizabethtown Tavern and its Ledger," Elmer T. 453-454) Food in wartime is often a precious commodity.85-93) Sample New Jersey prices: [1772: Mercer Country] "Princeton, 30th September 1772, 60 Dinners @2 s(hillings) each" ---"History of the Nassau Inn at Princeton," Prof. Lansing Collins, Proceedings of the New Jersey Historical Society, New Series, January 1930, Volume XV, No. 52) [1784: Burlington County NJ] Breakfast, 1 shilling; breakfast extraordinary, 1 shilling 3 pence; Dinner, 1 shilling 3 pence; Dinner extraordinary, 2 shillings; Supper, 1 shilling; Supper extraordinary, 2 shillings." ---Old Inns and Taverns in West Jersey, Camden County Historical Society, 1962) [1801: Middlesex County] In May, 1801 [Vernon Tavern, New Brunswick NJ] prices were fixed by Council were for a good breakfast 40 cents, a good dinner 50 cents, a good supper 40 cents, lodging 12 cents, making

Dinners in many urban taverns were, following English custom, offered as "ordinarys"...meaning a prepared meal open to the public offered at an established time for a set rate...Dishes, in some cases, were passed communally and not available as individual portions...Earliest prices are expressed in pence/colonial scrip. Food was generally included with the price of room.Food units are generally for large quantities, not comparable to modern supermarket prices. [SOURCE: Prices in Colonial Pennyslvania, Anne Bezanson, et al, University of Pennsylvania Press, 1935.] [1786-1817] Median annual prices for 14 leading commodities, Western Prices Before 1861/Thomas Senior Berry [Harvard University Press: Boston] 1943 [NOTE: This book offers dozens of price charts, including seasonal variations of Cincinnati Wholesale Commodity Prices 1824-1860 (p. [1832] Meat prices, Boston MA [1849] Retail food costs, California gold miners [1861-1865] American Civil War food prices [1860-2009] The Value of A Dollar: Prices and Incomes in the United States, selected food prices extracted from advertisements and federal data [NOTE: Value of a Dollar books are available in most public libraries. Urban taverns offered a wider range of services, including both public and private dining facilties. Pricing notes here: "The fare in a rural tavern..simple, whatever the tavern keeper had on hand for his/her own family and was willing to share...Among those more frequently met with are labor, shoes, butter, provisions, wine--doubtless 'home brew'--bottles, hay and other commodities of nature.However, to find a plow credited to the account of John Meeker [1792]..somewhat of a surprise." ---"An Elizabethtown Tavern and its Ledger," Elmer T. 453-454) Food in wartime is often a precious commodity.85-93) Sample New Jersey prices: [1772: Mercer Country] "Princeton, 30th September 1772, 60 Dinners @2 s(hillings) each" ---"History of the Nassau Inn at Princeton," Prof. Lansing Collins, Proceedings of the New Jersey Historical Society, New Series, January 1930, Volume XV, No. 52) [1784: Burlington County NJ] Breakfast, 1 shilling; breakfast extraordinary, 1 shilling 3 pence; Dinner, 1 shilling 3 pence; Dinner extraordinary, 2 shillings; Supper, 1 shilling; Supper extraordinary, 2 shillings." ---Old Inns and Taverns in West Jersey, Camden County Historical Society, 1962) [1801: Middlesex County] In May, 1801 [Vernon Tavern, New Brunswick NJ] prices were fixed by Council were for a good breakfast 40 cents, a good dinner 50 cents, a good supper 40 cents, lodging 12 cents, making $1.42 per day; while a common breakfast, dinner, and supper cost each 10 cents less or $1.12 per day, for the less particular customers.

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Dinners in many urban taverns were, following English custom, offered as "ordinarys"...meaning a prepared meal open to the public offered at an established time for a set rate...

Dishes, in some cases, were passed communally and not available as individual portions...

Earliest prices are expressed in pence/colonial scrip. Food was generally included with the price of room.

Food units are generally for large quantities, not comparable to modern supermarket prices. [SOURCE: Prices in Colonial Pennyslvania, Anne Bezanson, et al, University of Pennsylvania Press, 1935.] [1786-1817] Median annual prices for 14 leading commodities, Western Prices Before 1861/Thomas Senior Berry [Harvard University Press: Boston] 1943 [NOTE: This book offers dozens of price charts, including seasonal variations of Cincinnati Wholesale Commodity Prices 1824-1860 (p. [1832] Meat prices, Boston MA [1849] Retail food costs, California gold miners [1861-1865] American Civil War food prices [1860-2009] The Value of A Dollar: Prices and Incomes in the United States, selected food prices extracted from advertisements and federal data [NOTE: Value of a Dollar books are available in most public libraries. Urban taverns offered a wider range of services, including both public and private dining facilties. Pricing notes here: "The fare in a rural tavern..simple, whatever the tavern keeper had on hand for his/her own family and was willing to share...

Among those more frequently met with are labor, shoes, butter, provisions, wine--doubtless 'home brew'--bottles, hay and other commodities of nature.

However, to find a plow credited to the account of John Meeker [1792]..somewhat of a surprise." ---"An Elizabethtown Tavern and its Ledger," Elmer T. 453-454) Food in wartime is often a precious commodity.

85-93) Sample New Jersey prices: [1772: Mercer Country] "Princeton, 30th September 1772, 60 Dinners @2 s(hillings) each" ---"History of the Nassau Inn at Princeton," Prof. Lansing Collins, Proceedings of the New Jersey Historical Society, New Series, January 1930, Volume XV, No. 52) [1784: Burlington County NJ] Breakfast, 1 shilling; breakfast extraordinary, 1 shilling 3 pence; Dinner, 1 shilling 3 pence; Dinner extraordinary, 2 shillings; Supper, 1 shilling; Supper extraordinary, 2 shillings." ---Old Inns and Taverns in West Jersey, Camden County Historical Society, 1962) [1801: Middlesex County] In May, 1801 [Vernon Tavern, New Brunswick NJ] prices were fixed by Council were for a good breakfast 40 cents, a good dinner 50 cents, a good supper 40 cents, lodging 12 cents, making $1.42 per day; while a common breakfast, dinner, and supper cost each 10 cents less or $1.12 per day, for the less particular customers.

.42 per day; while a common breakfast, dinner, and supper cost each 10 cents less or

Dinners in many urban taverns were, following English custom, offered as "ordinarys"...meaning a prepared meal open to the public offered at an established time for a set rate...Dishes, in some cases, were passed communally and not available as individual portions...Earliest prices are expressed in pence/colonial scrip. Food was generally included with the price of room.Food units are generally for large quantities, not comparable to modern supermarket prices. [SOURCE: Prices in Colonial Pennyslvania, Anne Bezanson, et al, University of Pennsylvania Press, 1935.] [1786-1817] Median annual prices for 14 leading commodities, Western Prices Before 1861/Thomas Senior Berry [Harvard University Press: Boston] 1943 [NOTE: This book offers dozens of price charts, including seasonal variations of Cincinnati Wholesale Commodity Prices 1824-1860 (p. [1832] Meat prices, Boston MA [1849] Retail food costs, California gold miners [1861-1865] American Civil War food prices [1860-2009] The Value of A Dollar: Prices and Incomes in the United States, selected food prices extracted from advertisements and federal data [NOTE: Value of a Dollar books are available in most public libraries. Urban taverns offered a wider range of services, including both public and private dining facilties. Pricing notes here: "The fare in a rural tavern..simple, whatever the tavern keeper had on hand for his/her own family and was willing to share...Among those more frequently met with are labor, shoes, butter, provisions, wine--doubtless 'home brew'--bottles, hay and other commodities of nature.However, to find a plow credited to the account of John Meeker [1792]..somewhat of a surprise." ---"An Elizabethtown Tavern and its Ledger," Elmer T. 453-454) Food in wartime is often a precious commodity.85-93) Sample New Jersey prices: [1772: Mercer Country] "Princeton, 30th September 1772, 60 Dinners @2 s(hillings) each" ---"History of the Nassau Inn at Princeton," Prof. Lansing Collins, Proceedings of the New Jersey Historical Society, New Series, January 1930, Volume XV, No. 52) [1784: Burlington County NJ] Breakfast, 1 shilling; breakfast extraordinary, 1 shilling 3 pence; Dinner, 1 shilling 3 pence; Dinner extraordinary, 2 shillings; Supper, 1 shilling; Supper extraordinary, 2 shillings." ---Old Inns and Taverns in West Jersey, Camden County Historical Society, 1962) [1801: Middlesex County] In May, 1801 [Vernon Tavern, New Brunswick NJ] prices were fixed by Council were for a good breakfast 40 cents, a good dinner 50 cents, a good supper 40 cents, lodging 12 cents, making $1.42 per day; while a common breakfast, dinner, and supper cost each 10 cents less or $1.12 per day, for the less particular customers.

||

Dinners in many urban taverns were, following English custom, offered as "ordinarys"...meaning a prepared meal open to the public offered at an established time for a set rate...

Dishes, in some cases, were passed communally and not available as individual portions...

Earliest prices are expressed in pence/colonial scrip. Food was generally included with the price of room.

Food units are generally for large quantities, not comparable to modern supermarket prices. [SOURCE: Prices in Colonial Pennyslvania, Anne Bezanson, et al, University of Pennsylvania Press, 1935.] [1786-1817] Median annual prices for 14 leading commodities, Western Prices Before 1861/Thomas Senior Berry [Harvard University Press: Boston] 1943 [NOTE: This book offers dozens of price charts, including seasonal variations of Cincinnati Wholesale Commodity Prices 1824-1860 (p. [1832] Meat prices, Boston MA [1849] Retail food costs, California gold miners [1861-1865] American Civil War food prices [1860-2009] The Value of A Dollar: Prices and Incomes in the United States, selected food prices extracted from advertisements and federal data [NOTE: Value of a Dollar books are available in most public libraries. Urban taverns offered a wider range of services, including both public and private dining facilties. Pricing notes here: "The fare in a rural tavern..simple, whatever the tavern keeper had on hand for his/her own family and was willing to share...

Among those more frequently met with are labor, shoes, butter, provisions, wine--doubtless 'home brew'--bottles, hay and other commodities of nature.

However, to find a plow credited to the account of John Meeker [1792]..somewhat of a surprise." ---"An Elizabethtown Tavern and its Ledger," Elmer T. 453-454) Food in wartime is often a precious commodity.

85-93) Sample New Jersey prices: [1772: Mercer Country] "Princeton, 30th September 1772, 60 Dinners @2 s(hillings) each" ---"History of the Nassau Inn at Princeton," Prof. Lansing Collins, Proceedings of the New Jersey Historical Society, New Series, January 1930, Volume XV, No. 52) [1784: Burlington County NJ] Breakfast, 1 shilling; breakfast extraordinary, 1 shilling 3 pence; Dinner, 1 shilling 3 pence; Dinner extraordinary, 2 shillings; Supper, 1 shilling; Supper extraordinary, 2 shillings." ---Old Inns and Taverns in West Jersey, Camden County Historical Society, 1962) [1801: Middlesex County] In May, 1801 [Vernon Tavern, New Brunswick NJ] prices were fixed by Council were for a good breakfast 40 cents, a good dinner 50 cents, a good supper 40 cents, lodging 12 cents, making $1.42 per day; while a common breakfast, dinner, and supper cost each 10 cents less or $1.12 per day, for the less particular customers.

.12 per day, for the less particular customers.

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War ration book, New Jersey Price and Supply on the Home Front, Harriet Elliott, Consumer Division, Office of Price Administration and Civilian Supply, Survey Graphic, July, 1941.Breakfast, dinner, and supper were the same price, one shilling and six pence...At Allen, the meals were seldom as expensive as the drink sold...American Civil War: prices & fluxuations In all places and periods, supply and demand dictate market prices.Retail food price comparisons between the North and South during the Civil War are complicated because they had different money and inflation rates at different points during the War. Most of the American Civil War was fought on Southern soil.

War ration book, New Jersey Price and Supply on the Home Front, Harriet Elliott, Consumer Division, Office of Price Administration and Civilian Supply, Survey Graphic, July, 1941.

Breakfast, dinner, and supper were the same price, one shilling and six pence...

At Allen, the meals were seldom as expensive as the drink sold...

American Civil War: prices & fluxuations In all places and periods, supply and demand dictate market prices.

Retail food price comparisons between the North and South during the Civil War are complicated because they had different money and inflation rates at different points during the War. Most of the American Civil War was fought on Southern soil.

Select CT1970p1-08Chapter G: "Consumer Income & Expenditures." Skip to page 302 "Consumer Expenditure Patterns," where you find definitions and sources. See also Cummings [1817-1930] [1890-1970] Basic commodities (go to page 213): average retail prices of flour, bread, round steak, pork chops, bacon, butter, eggs, milk (delivered), oranges, potatoes, tomatoes (canned), Navy beans, coffee, margarine & sugar, reported by the federal government. However, whatever the quality of the food served, the proprietor was allowed to charge a predetermined price...