Accommodating children with special needs in the classroom

23-Mar-2018 01:53

Children with developmental disabilities can be much more independent when they have strong visual cues to guide them through the physical space of the classroom.You can, for example: Post a clear and predictable daily schedule (Volmer, 1995).Children with significant disabilities are likely to need explicit programming to generalize skills that they have learned in a particular classroom setting to other settings or situations (Koegel, Koegel & Carter, 1999, Volmer, 1995).If your child is eligible for special education services, you may worry he’ll be placed in a different classroom than other kids his age.

In either case, both teachers are available to help all students. One key teaching strategy is to break students into small groups.

But remember-schedules have value only when they are used!

Students should preview their schedule at the start of the school day.

Children with developmental disabilities should therefore have explicit skills-training in deficit areas as a central component in their curriculum.

Here are additional classroom ideas for accommodating students with significant special needs: Use visual cues to orient student in the classroom (Volmer, 1995).

In either case, both teachers are available to help all students. One key teaching strategy is to break students into small groups.

But remember-schedules have value only when they are used!

Students should preview their schedule at the start of the school day.

Children with developmental disabilities should therefore have explicit skills-training in deficit areas as a central component in their curriculum.

Here are additional classroom ideas for accommodating students with significant special needs: Use visual cues to orient student in the classroom (Volmer, 1995).

In an inclusion classroom, the general education teacher and special education teacher work together to meet your child’s needs. That means they should spend as much time as possible with students who don’t receive special education services. Some use a collaborative team teaching (or co-teaching) model.